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Nursing

Using APA? Yes!

Sample in-text citations: 

(Lane, 2015)        (Brackney & Fiske, 2019)

Sample references:

Simmons, L. A., Wu, Q., Yang, N., Bush, H. M., & Crofford, L. J. (2015). Sources of Health Information among Rural Women in Western Kentucky. Public Health Nursing, 32(1), 3–14. https://doi.org/10.1111/phn.12134
MacDonald-Wicks, L., & Levett-Jones, T. (2012). Effective teaching of communication to health professional undergraduate and postgraduate students: A Systematic Review: JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 10(Suppl), 1–12. https://doi.org/10.11124/jbisrir-2012-327

 

Also see:

Library guide

AppState Writing Center: Overview, Sample paper, and Header instructions.

Just in Case: CINAHL and PubMed

Nuances -- Boolean, PICO

Boolean : 

AND  You use AND by default.  Intersection of sets.  Concussion prevention uses AND function and only gives you results (articles, webpages, etc) that have both words.

OR   OR allows you to search synonyms or related (or even unrelated) concepts at the same time.  Ankle OR knee OR foot allows you to search all these concepts at one time.  For most complex searches use parentheses, (Ankle OR knee OR foot).  Carolina OR tennessee OR virginia OR appalach*.  Teenager OR adolescent OR youth.  Elderly OR aged OR older OR senior.  The asterisk searches variations with the same beginning letters.

NOT   You probably will not use NOT often.  Get rid of unwanted results, if you can identify a word that will work.  (Leg OR knee OR thigh) NOT ankle.  (I often use Nurs* NOT "nursing homes.")

Quotation marks are useful, but strictly speaking, are not Boolean.

PICO

Helps with creating an answerable, useful question.  Helps with choice of search words.

Problem or population  -- stroke victims with swallowing disorders, 50-60 years old

Intervention -- possible new treatment (or assessment method)

Comparison (or placebo) -- what's being used up to now.

Outcome -- return to eating solids unassisted.