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Recreation Management: Home

Databases for Rec Management

I especially recommend SPORTDiscus, but I'd also use Google Scholar, and APPsearch from library main page. Or at bottom of this page.

Search methods

3 categories:

1. Which words and phrases?  need distinctive terms

2. Which databases and search engines?

3. What other methods?  I especially like following citations and "Cited by," and authors who I know are interested in my topic.

 

Two example searches (Fall 2023):

1. heat recreation outdoors

2. ("destination weddings" OR "wedding tourism")  (venues OR locations OR places OR spaces)

1a. proximity or distance to parks or public green spaces (urban/suburban).  What outcomes?

1b. recreation for rural communities

2. social effects on participation in recreation and leisure activities, "social networks," "social support," "social isolation"

 

Getting full text

Click on Find@ASU and Find@AppState button.  Also try DOI number with LibKey.io/

 

What are peer reviewed articles?  How to find them and exclude non-peer-reviewed stuff?  How to tell if what you find really is peer-reviewed?

Peer-reviewed articles are one thing.  But how could you be certain a source was "reputable"?

 

Other concerns: citing correctly, managing what you find.  See AppState Writing Center help.

 

Annotated bibliographies

Follow Dr. Cline's guidance first, but also see the AppState Writing Center's advice

Spring 2024

Questions?  Need help?   wiswellj@appstate.edu.  Email me, or we can meet in person, Levine or main campus, or in Zoom, if needed.

APPsearch and Google Scholar

    

Advanced search

 

To get the full text of articles, try both the Find@Appstate link and the article title, or contact a librarian for assistance.

Diversity and equity concerns

Consider as you define your topic focusing on a vulnerable subpopulation, instead of only the entire population.  Leave some room in your outline for focusing more narrowly in this area.

A more comprehensive search is more likely to find sources by researchers from marginalized groups.  Cite women, for one example.

For topics where there are plenty of sources, consider focusing on any that included participation among subject population.  Look for phrases like "participatory research," but also any that demonstrate engagement with the subject community.

Health Sciences Librarian

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John Wiswell

Levine Hall 542F & Belk Library 225, (828)262-7853